Tag Archives: Women’s Convention

SOMEONE NEEDS TO SAVE US. WHO WILL IT BE?

By Joann Castle, December 5, 2017

Last evening, in a spontaneous late night gesture, I playfully posted the trailer for the movie, Avengers; Infinity War, on our Against the Tide Facebook page, under the caption “Someone Needs to Save Us!”  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZfuNTqbHE8&feature=youtube

While Iron Man, Thor, the Hulk and the rest of the avengers may have something to teach us about uniting against the enemy, the Marvel super heroes cannot save us. The reality is that we have to save ourselves, and that won’t happen on Facebook or Youtube or Twitter. These social media sites function well as communication and networking tools but saving ourselves requires hard work.

Avengers_(Marvel_Comics)_vol_3_num_38

Marvel Studios Photo

I don’t know about you but the character of the Facebook feed I am getting from my friends has significantly changed over the last several months. Everyone is getting very serious because we realize that our democracy is under attack. Mostly, my feed consists of petitions to sign, requests to contact my congressmen or women, solicitations of contributions for social justice causes, requests to support people running for elected office, for victims of injustice, for tragedies like Puerto Rico, for Dreamers or immigrants being torn from their families by ICE.

Make no mistake, I support these efforts. I sign petitions and contribute what I can but sitting at my computer is not going to create the dynamic coalition that is needed to make change. We need to get off our computer chairs, our iPhones and Tablets and stand up for what we believe in.

Go to your congressman’s office, run for an elected office, volunteer at your local school, homeless shelter or soup kitchen, mentor a child, support a family fractured by the actions of ICE, hold a voter-registration event, attend discussions at your local bookstore or Indivisible group and meet people like yourself.  Collaborate and develop coalitions with other groups in your communities that share your values. This is a ground-up fight. Speak up; speak out or you may be the last one standing and have no one to speak for you.

I recently posted a Youtube video, rEVOLUTION CINCY. The video was written, produced and directed by Liz Wu, a talented young musician from Cincinnati. The message is a call to action geared to young people in their communities but its message applies to all. Liz’s music will bring you to your feet with a mesmerizing beat and lyrics that resonate today:

“Vote with your dollars, vote with your time, vote with your actions, vote with your mind.” This musical gem is followed by a list of local issues where people can vote by zip code, choosing the three biggest issues in their communities that need attention. This is an organizing strategy intended to get folks together and do something. Become a superhero and do something to aid your community.  View the video at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jE6tdr40ZU/.

Art and music created by our young people offer creative space for thinking about our future in new ways. Be inspired and cultivate your own super hero talents as you stand up and fight in our unfortunately, very real infinity war.

Everybody’s busy; it’s the nature of our lives. But this is the perfect time to ask ourselves: How can we direct our actions in the time we can muster, to have a meaningful impact on saving our communities today? Become an empowered patriot, fight for the values you believe in, civil rights, due process and a truly representative democracy. So, step aside Captain America, we’ve got work to do.

WHAT MY LEFT HAND WAS DOING: LESSONS FROM A GRASSROOTS ACTIVIST

Coming soon…

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FROM “#ME TOO” TO “YOU, ALSO.” GOOD MEN MUST SPEAK OUT

The timing of the recent “Women’s Convention” and the excellent choice of content by the women of color who led it, is deeply relevant to our daily lives. This alignment to women’s lives today has inspired me to write a number of blogs on topics discussed at the conference.

One of those topics is sexual harassment. “#Me too” is a movement created by Tarana Burke serving to empower women through empathy. Burke was joined by actress Rose McGowan who kicked off a panel discussion titled “Fighting for Survivors of Sexual Assault.”

It is notable that it took more than a decade before #MeToo spilled out into the public consciousness. It was only this past October when white women began using #MeToo on social media that sexual harassment became a social concern. I say this understanding that any woman, who publicly speaks out, puts themselves at risk. This is a problem for all of us. But let’s be clear, black and brown women and women of color have been repeatedly raped by white men throughout our history as a country.

It was so heartening when one man on the convention panel reflected on the pervasiveness of sexual harassment and assault in American culture. “This is nothing new,” he said. “But it is time for this conversation to come out in the open. Ours has been a culture of rape ever since the very first European boat arrived on America’s shores.” There was an audible pause from the audience followed by shouts of appreciation and plenty of tears as women internalized that it was not their fault that our culture developed this way. Thinking back, we know the history of the founding of our nation and the venereal diseases that were spread among the native population. But this man’s words connected the dots, and absolved some of the guilt women often feel about allowing ourselves to be trapped in untenable situations. It was then that I began thinking how important it is for men to become allies in our #MeToo movement.

Today, I am asking: Where is the courage of our men to add their voices to this cry for an adjustment to our social norms? It will take the actions of men as well as women, to move us forward. I believe that it is time for men of good conscience to step forward and add their voices. When I first put the accompanying photo on Facebook, one woman commented: “Men do not understand.” I don’t believe that is true of all men. I was married to a man who forcefully spoke out against sexual abuse of women in the black power movement back in 1972. I believe there are a lot of good men who respect women but are complacent in speaking out as they observe women being abused, not only physically but verbally, because they are concerned about backlash.

Yes, there will be a backlash to those men who step forward on our behalf. But we need our men to be as brave as our women and speak out. We need the courage of men who do understand to help us change the sexual norms of abuse and degradation of women in our society. Where are our good men and how can we support their voices? If we are to make social change, we must do it together. What are you going to do, the next time you observe sexual harassment?

WHAT MY LEFT HAND WAS DOING: LESSONS FROM A GRASSROOTS ACTIVIST

By Joann Castle   Coming soon…

I invite you to “follow” my blog by clicking on the follow button at the top right. You will receive notices of new posts and can keep updated on my book publication timeline.

Thanks for reading!  

WOMEN MOVE FROM MARCHING TO ACTION

This is part two of a blog about my experience in attending the Women’s March October Convention in Detroit. At the Convention, leaders of the historic January 21st Women’s March shifted into forward gear to reengineer the D.C. March into an active resistance movement that includes both urban and rural women from all over the country.

Women aren’t in a waiting mood. They are stepping forward to become the change. The results of last Tuesday’s election wins in VA, NJ, FL and WA were in part, a direct result of commitments made at the D.C. March and suggest that women are in this for the long haul.

What I experienced at the Detroit Convention was a shift in strategies that transform the current women’s movement from one of spontaneous action into strategic programs to sustain us in a new age of struggle. This evolution will demand much more than just showing up. We need to bring our full-selves to this work. Although there were women of all ages at the event, the Convention was largely conducted by young women of color who see the urgency created by our current political conditions and have the skills and talent to lead us.

Packed Convention Workshops

Convention work groups took up bold new themes that are emerging in our society as we witness an alarming resurgence of white supremacy and state sanctioned violence. We have finally begun to openly discuss the role that race plays in our society. The ideology behind the efforts to move forward is new to many and requires a rethink of how we understand the role that race plays in our day-to-day lives. To begin this conversation, there is an increasing need for white people to understand the concept of white privilege and how to become an ally of people who have been oppressed in our society. We must support these daring discussions.

Since the time, white men landed on our shores, white men and women have taken their supremacy for granted. Yet, the white Anglo-Saxon tribe was only one of many cultures that existed across the world. Throughout their history in the new world, whites have sustained an aggressive culture that conquers, takes resources, and controls others by isolating them from the economic and political systems necessary for equality. White children often grow up believing that the white race is normal and that all other cultures are deviations from the norm. Women are now taking the lead in forging a new vision for our future.

In addition to the training at the Women’s Convention, there are a number of local seminars emerging on the topic of white privilege. I recently attended a frank discussion between whites and women of color, called “Get Your People” at Detroit’s Historical Society. I also note from the Convention literature that a group called Allies for Change www.alliesforchange.org will be offering seminars “Doing Our Work” across Michigan in 2018 to further expand these discussions. Some of the Indivisible groups are also having discussions on these topics. Indivisible, largely made up of women, has more than 5,000 groups across the country with at least two in every state.

If we are to move forward together, it is imperative that we do the deep work that is required to embody an anti-racist identity and learn how to develop relationships of accountability to people of color, interrupting the pervasive racism in our communities, our work lives and even in our family relationships.

If we don’t want to live in the kind of world we see emerging from the shadows of our new government, we must take responsibility for acting on our beliefs. In addition to educating ourselves, the following actions were recommended at the Conference. Several were suggested by Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1967.

  1. Contribute to groups like the ACLU or the NAACP that have a track record of doing good work in this regard.
  2. Be thoughtful about where you shop. Support minority businesses.
  3. Put your money in black banks or credit unions.
  4. Volunteer in your communities. Change will not come from our government but from the ground up.
  5. Vote like your life depends on it.

WHAT MY LEFT HAND WAS DOING: LESSONS FROM A GRASSROOTS ACTIVIST

By Joann Castle   Coming soon…

I invite you to “follow” my blog by clicking on the follow button at the top right. You will receive notices of new posts and can keep updated on my book publication timeline.

Thanks for reading!  

ME, MAXINE AND 4,500 WOMEN CREATE A FOUNDATION FOR ACTION

Reclaiming our Time was the theme of the three-day Women’s March Convention held last weekend at the Cobo Center in Detroit. The agenda was a call to action launched nine months after the post-inauguration D.C. March that drew millions of women across the world into the streets to protest Donald Trump’s election. (You can place your own significance on the nine-month time frame.) The Women’s Convention was organized by Tamika Mallory, Carman Perez and Linda Sarsour, who also organized the D.C. March. Well done, my friends. It was totally inspiring.

Detroit’s expanded and updated Cobo Center proved an excellent venue. Its main hall easily accommodated the 4,500 women attending, with ample room to house the 176 action-oriented workshops included in the program. The nearness of Cobo to the Detroit River and the realization that Canada was so close was a pleasant surprise to many of the women who came from out of town. I was also pretty happy that I could walk from my home to the convention and grateful that they gave me a scholarship so that I could attend. One third of the women attending did so through scholarships.

The convention’s overarching theme was the creation and fostering of an intersectional feminist movement led by people of color, which encompasses issues of race, class, gender, immigration status and disabilities, acknowledging that we are all going to rise together or fall together. We live in a society that deliberately segregates us and pits us against each other. If we do not organize across these sectors, we risk becoming oppressors of others who are also fighting for liberation.

My personal hero, Maxine Waters, the outspoken 79-year-old, Congresswoman from California, was the keynote speaker and minced no words in calling out the role of men in positions of power who abuse women through sexual harassment and assault but also through the general degradation of women, especially women of color, in the workplace, on the street and many times in their homes. While there were chants to “Impeach 45,” Donald Trump’s name was seldom used. We were all about building and not tearing down.

Congresswoman Waters was joined by Senators Kristen Gillibrand, Amy Klobuchar, and Debbie Stabenow. Senator Gillibrand reminded the crowd not to depend on congressional leadership in Washington: “The only time our democracy ever works is when regular people just like you, stand up and demand it.” Stephanie Schriock, president of Emily’s List shared that since the presidential election, 20,000 women have contacted Emily’s List to express interest in running for political office. They have trained 1,900 women and have short term goals of taking back the House and the Senate. It was gratifying to see many rural women attending the conference and sharing common cause.

One of the most popular workshops at the conference was, “Confronting White Womanhood.” The session focused on helping white women understand how white privilege functions as a barrier to resolving race relations. The response to the workshop was so overwhelming that it was repeated and required a room that seated 500 people to accommodate all the white women who wanted this training. One of the co-creators of the workshop noted: “We live in a world where some people have power and some people don’t…white supremacy is the problem that white people need to fix.”

(My report on the conference will continue in next week’s blog. Stay tuned.)

WHAT MY LEFT HAND WAS DOING: LESSONS FROM A GRASSROOTS ACTIVIST

By Joann Castle   Coming soon…

I invite you to “follow” my blog by clicking on the follow button at the top right. You will receive notices of new posts and can keep updated on my book publication timeline.

Thanks for reading!