Tag Archives: Mike Hamlin

BOOK RELEASE TODAY; NOW SHE’S YOURS

WHAT MY LEFT HAND WAS DOING: Lessons from a Grassroots Activist  by Joann Castle

Dear Book, Go forth and multiply. You leave me feeling like I’ve raised another offspring, sometimes joyfully and other times with much pain. But today, you are launched, baby. I’ve given you some of the best years of my life, now go into the world and make me proud. 

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It’s been crazy this past week with two book signings, one at SOURCE Booksellers where Greg Hicks and I engaged in a community conversation about my book, and the other at Signature Grill in downtown Detroit. I also promoted my book at an author’s table at Preservation Detroit’s annual Authors Fair. Finally, last night, I was unexpectedly called to join a panel at the Hamtramck Free School, after a showing of the classic film, Finally Got the News. I was able to comment on the period when this film, about the League of Revolutionary Black Workers was made, and share why it is so important for white people to support the black freedom struggle. I was so pleased to see that the audience was made up of young people who are finding their way in the ongoing struggle for social justice.

SOURCE 3 042918Also happening:  My book was chosen to appear on the cover of the April 9th issue of Publishers Weekly magazine.  In addition, I received a rating of “It was amazing,” from a reviewer on goodreads.com, and at booklife.com, I received a rating of 10 out of 10 from a critic, reviewing for the annual BookLife Prize. Winners will be announced at the end of the year. This is a book you don’t want to miss.

This is just the beginning of my marketing campaign. I am available to speak at libraries and book clubs or your community events. Anyone interested can contact me through this website at   https://againstthetidebooks.com or by email at: joanncastle@againstthetide.com.

I have one more book signing scheduled on May 20th from 2:00 – 4:00 at Pages Bookshop, 19560 Grand River, Detroit, MI. I have asked my niece, Alena to speak with me and offer her view on my work from the perspective of a young person today.     

Books are available for order on line at Amazon.com and The Seattle Book Company. Also available locally at SOURCE Booksellers in Detroit, In Seattle, at Third Place Books, Elliott Bay Book Company and Left Bank Books on Pike Street, across from Pike Place Market.

Ask your favorite book store to order it from Ingram.

GRIEVING AND LEGACIES

I’m grieving right now. At the moment my pain is who I am. For forty-five years, Mike Hamlin was my confidant, my lover, my husband, and my best friend. In that sense, I have nothing to complain about. I was so fortunate to be loved by Mike who was both a committed black labor activist and a devoted family man. Mike gave me everything in life that mattered. As a mutual friend told me recently, “They don’t make ‘em like that anymore.”

I am desperately working to finish my book which is a tribute to Mike, our love for each other and for those who give their hearts to the struggle for social justice. My story takes place in Detroit during the tumultuous years of the 60s and 70s, but it is more–in that I seek parallels in our current period and offer lessons learned on how to avoid mistakes we made in the past.

Mike was a big supporter of my decision to use the written word as a medium for reflecting on our history. He was also my first-line proofreader, which led to many hours of mutual reflection on the period and what it means today. Our long discussions revealed many facets of the intense aspects of being in a movement. I learned, and he learned many details of our experiences during this period that in our busy lives, we had never discussed before.

Now you can read about it in my UPCOMING BOOK:

What My Left Hand Was Doing: Lessons from a Grassroots Activist

       by Joann Castle

Includes an Activist’s Survival Guide.

COMING IN FALL 2017: “Follow” my blog to get the latest details.

MOTHER FOUND AT THE HENRY FORD

Ken Car Mother FoundYou all know the slogan. All Michigander’s do: “You haven’t lived until you…” followed by some Michigan international destination like “Greenfield Village”. It was always easy to gauge how well you know the state by these monikers. When they changed the name of Greenfield Village to “The Henry Ford,” I was totally lost. But now, for a very personal reason, I’m getting found again.

You see, I’m the mother of seven children. They are all equally precious to me. Every once in a while, one of my children will do something publically noted that gives me permission to boast a bit about their contribution to the world. This time, the evidence can be found at Greenfield Village… Oops, excuse me, I mean, The Henry Ford.

My oldest son, Ken, is a mechanical engineer. He grew up the kind of kid who couldn’t keep his hands out from under the hood. I think his first word was ‘car’ which soon grew into ‘car racing’. Currently, Ken is Vice-President of an Ann-Arbor company that makes prototypes and tests parts for transportation and motorsports.

A few years ago, Ken joined a team competing for the Progressive Insurance Automotive X Prize, a $10 million competition aimed at advancing technology for more fuel-efficient vehicles. More than 111 teams from all over the world worked to build a car that achieved 100 miles per gallon or the energy equivalent.

Ken’s company developed the engine for Edison2, winner of the Mainstream class of the Automotive X-PRIZE with its 100+ MPG car of the future – Very Light Car. This car is on permanent display in the Henry Ford Museum Automotive Exhibit at (Yes, I’ve got it now) The Henry Ford.  Take a look next time you visit: Edison2 – the Very Light Car.

Won’t you join us on our journey, click ‘follow’ on this website and we will keep you updated on our adventures.

VIOLA LIUZZO LOVED HER CHILDREN ENOUGH TO FIGHT FOR A BETTER WORLD

On Sunday, April 12th, Mike and I had the honor and the privilege of meeting the children of civil rights martyr, Viola Liuzzo. Viola’s tragic death in Selma, Alabama in 1965 was the event that brought me into the civil rights movement.  In many ways, Viola was like me, a local white woman raised Catholic, with five small children. She was an empathic woman with a big heart and when the call went out to support those brutally assaulted as they marched for voting rights, Viola headed to Alabama

On March 25th, as Viola was shuttling marchers back to Selma, she was murdered on the highway by members of the Ku Klux Klan. In the car, was an FBI informant who later bragged about the killing. The FBI went on to smear Viola’s name and attempt to destroy her family.  Somehow, I felt a kinship with Viola and I understood why she was compelled to go to Selma. In a sense, that week in 1965, I stepped into the movement to take her place.

Mike Viola Liuzzo's children

Mike with Viola Liuzzo’s children.

This month, in Detroit, Viola’s family was given a hero’s welcome on the 50th anniversary of her death. She was posthumously awarded a degree at Wayne State University where she was a student. Among the many events in her honor, was a Morris Dees lecture at Wayne State Law School, a tribute at Macomb Community College, and a celebration of her life at the Unitarian Church on Wayne State’s Campus. A park near her home in Northwest Detroit was re-dedicated in her honor.

Mike and I are grateful for the opportunity to converse with four of her children. It has been a difficult road for them as they struggled to vindicate their mother’s image from slander by the FBI. “She prepared us,” their daughter Mary told us. “It was the way she raised us.” “Thank you, Mom. You loved us enough to fight for a better world.”

Please click  ‘follow’ on this website and join Mike and I on our journey.

Personal Histories in the Struggle for Justice.

BURTON THEATRE VENUE PROMOTES COMMUNITY DISCUSSION

Mike and I recently attended a showing of the movie, “Brothers on the Line” at Cinema Detroit an independent film theatre in Detroit’s midtown district, and the original site of the Burton Theatre whose name still stands at the driveway entrance. Mike was invited to participate in a panel discussion of the film.

“Brothers on the Line” is a well-constructed documentary covering the story of the Reuther brothers and the making of the U.A.W. Written and directed by Sasha Reuther, grandson of Walter Reuther, this film stands both as a fitting memorial about the dedication of the Reuther family to a more just society as well as IMG_5219an excellent educational tool for our younger generation.

The panel was introduced by Tony Paris, lead lawyer at the Maurice Sugar Law Center, and included Graham Cassano, author, professor, and film critic from Oakland University; Steve Babson, author, labor educator, and union activist who assisted with production of the film; and Mike Hamlin, co-founder of the Inner-City Voice newspaper and one of the leaders of DRUM and the League of Revolutionary Black Workers, who spawned a black workers movement in Detroit in the late 1960s.

We should support Detroit’s independent film theatres that offer alternative films and venues for interactive community discussion. Our appreciation goes out to Paula and Tim Gathiet who are keeping the Burton Theatre tradition alive. Check them out at: www.cinemadetroit.com.

Mike’s book. A Black Revolutionary’s Life in Labor: Workers Black Power in Detroit is a book for labor activists, students and educators, community organizers and lovers of black history. Order your copy now on this website. Also available on Amazon.com.

Won’t you join us on our journey. Click ‘Follow’ on this blog page.