WOMEN MOVE FROM MARCHING TO ACTION

This is part two of a blog about my experience in attending the Women’s March October Convention in Detroit. At the Convention, leaders of the historic January 21st Women’s March shifted into forward gear to reengineer the D.C. March into an active resistance movement that includes both urban and rural women from all over the country.

Women aren’t in a waiting mood. They are stepping forward to become the change. The results of last Tuesday’s election wins in VA, NJ, FL and WA were in part, a direct result of commitments made at the D.C. March and suggest that women are in this for the long haul.

What I experienced at the Detroit Convention was a shift in strategies that transform the current women’s movement from one of spontaneous action into strategic programs to sustain us in a new age of struggle. This evolution will demand much more than just showing up. We need to bring our full-selves to this work. Although there were women of all ages at the event, the Convention was largely conducted by young women of color who see the urgency created by our current political conditions and have the skills and talent to lead us.

Packed Convention Workshops

Convention work groups took up bold new themes that are emerging in our society as we witness an alarming resurgence of white supremacy and state sanctioned violence. We have finally begun to openly discuss the role that race plays in our society. The ideology behind the efforts to move forward is new to many and requires a rethink of how we understand the role that race plays in our day-to-day lives. To begin this conversation, there is an increasing need for white people to understand the concept of white privilege and how to become an ally of people who have been oppressed in our society. We must support these daring discussions.

Since the time, white men landed on our shores, white men and women have taken their supremacy for granted. Yet, the white Anglo-Saxon tribe was only one of many cultures that existed across the world. Throughout their history in the new world, whites have sustained an aggressive culture that conquers, takes resources, and controls others by isolating them from the economic and political systems necessary for equality. White children often grow up believing that the white race is normal and that all other cultures are deviations from the norm. Women are now taking the lead in forging a new vision for our future.

In addition to the training at the Women’s Convention, there are a number of local seminars emerging on the topic of white privilege. I recently attended a frank discussion between whites and women of color, called “Get Your People” at Detroit’s Historical Society. I also note from the Convention literature that a group called Allies for Change www.alliesforchange.org will be offering seminars “Doing Our Work” across Michigan in 2018 to further expand these discussions. Some of the Indivisible groups are also having discussions on these topics. Indivisible, largely made up of women, has more than 5,000 groups across the country with at least two in every state.

If we are to move forward together, it is imperative that we do the deep work that is required to embody an anti-racist identity and learn how to develop relationships of accountability to people of color, interrupting the pervasive racism in our communities, our work lives and even in our family relationships.

If we don’t want to live in the kind of world we see emerging from the shadows of our new government, we must take responsibility for acting on our beliefs. In addition to educating ourselves, the following actions were recommended at the Conference. Several were suggested by Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1967.

  1. Contribute to groups like the ACLU or the NAACP that have a track record of doing good work in this regard.
  2. Be thoughtful about where you shop. Support minority businesses.
  3. Put your money in black banks or credit unions.
  4. Volunteer in your communities. Change will not come from our government but from the ground up.
  5. Vote like your life depends on it.

WHAT MY LEFT HAND WAS DOING: LESSONS FROM A GRASSROOTS ACTIVIST

By Joann Castle   Coming soon…

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